Welcome to the H. T. Soh Lab

     

    The Soh Laboratory Group at University of California, Santa Barbara works to develop novel materials and devices to improve the condition of human health. Our laboratory consists of researchers from many disciplines, including Physics, Chemistry, and diverse areas of engineering such as Materials, Mechanical, Chemical, and Electrical Engineering. Currently, our research focuses on two main themes: Directed Evolution of Materials and Integrated Biosensors. These two technologies hold the promise for early detection and personalized treatment for many diseases including Alzheimer’s, cancer, and diabetes.

     

    In the News
  • Our team receives 2014 Keck Grant Award in Medical Research [click for link]

  • The Director's office at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) highlights our lab's work on nucleic acid aptamers. Using DNA for More than Genetic Information. [click for link]

  • Tracy Chuong and Cayuga Biotech wins second place in the 2014 UCSB New Venture Competition (Tech Push category). Congratulations, Tracy! [click for link]

  • Diana Wu wins the Dean's Fellowship at UCSB - Congratulations, Diana!!

  • MEDIC attracts the attention of NIH as potential tool for personalized medicine. [click for link]

  • Professor Soh is inducted as a fellow to American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). [click for press release]

  • Nature Magazine highlights our work on real-time biosensors. [click for link]

  • Our MEDIC technology is showcased on Healthline.com. [click for link]

  • Chemical and Engineering News highlights our MEDIC technology, calling it "clever with a capital C." [click for link]

  • Science Magazine highlights Dr. Scott Ferguson's article which made the cover of Science Translational Medicine. [click for link]

  • Read about Royal Society of Chemistry's highlight of our MEDIC platform. [click for link]
  • Archived News
Recent Publications
  • P. Jiang, et al., "MPBind: A Meta-Motif Based Statistical Framework and Pipeline to Predict Binding Potential of SELEX-derived Aptamers" Bioinformatics (In Press 2014)
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  • K. Hsieh, et al., "Simultaneous Elimination of Carryover Contamination and Detection of DNA with Uracil-DNA-Glycosylase-Supplemented Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (UDG-LAMP)" ChemComm 50 (28) 3747-3749 (2014)
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  • J. P. Wang et al., "Particle Display: A Quantitative Screening Method for Generating High-Affinity Aptamers" Angew. Chemie. Int'l Ed. 126 (19) 4896–4901 (2014).
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  • A. H. J. Yang et al., "Accurate Zygote-Specific SNP Discrimination Using Microfluidic Electrochemical DNA Melt Curves," Angew. Chemie. Int'l Ed. 126 (12) 3227–3231 (2014)
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  • B. S. Ferguson et al.,  "Real-time, aptamer-based tracking of circulating therapeutic agents in living animals," Science Translational Medicine, 5, 213ra165 (2013).

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  • S. S. Oh et. al., "In Vitro Selection of Shape-Changing DNA Nanostructures Capable of Binding-Induced Cargo Release," ACS Nano, 7 (11) 9675–9683 (2013).


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